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M10 MPa Concrete Calculator (1:3:6 Concrete Mix Calculator)

Are you looking for 10 MPa concrete calculator? If yes, you’ve just arrived at the right place:

This is a Calculator is used to implement a form with three input fields for concrete element in ratio 1:3:6 (for length, width, and height). The form allows the user to enter values for the length, width, and height of a concrete element. The input fields are implemented as range sliders. As the user adjusts the sliders, the corresponding values are displayed below the sliders in real time.

When you’ll change the values, the values that they have entered are used to perform a calculation for 1:3:6 or 10 MPa concrete mix and display the result. The code also includes some styling information for the form elements, as well as a tool tip that is displayed when the user hovers over the label for the height input field.

Table of Contents

10MPa Concrete Mix Calculator

Note: it’s a dynamic form that means it will calculate the results in realtime as you enter values.










What is 10 Mpa Concrete?

“10 MPa concrete” is a type of concrete with a compressive strength of 10 megapascals (MPa). The compressive strength of concrete is a measure of its resistance to crushing under a compressive load. It is expressed in megapascals (MPa), which is a unit of pressure. The higher the compressive strength of the concrete, the more resistant it is to crushing.

The “1:3:6” ratio refers to the proportions of cement, sand, and coarse aggregate used in the concrete mix. The numbers represent the parts of each material by volume. For example, in a 1:3:6 mix, there would be 1 part cement, 3 parts sand, and 6 parts coarse aggregate by volume. The proportions of these materials are typically expressed in terms of the volume of the dry materials, before water is added to the mix to initiate the chemical reaction that causes the concrete to harden.

How to calculate quantity for 1:3:6 concrete mix?

Here is a table that shows the calculations for estimating the amounts of cement, sand, and aggregate needed to produce 26 cubic meters (m3) of 1:3:6 concrete:

MaterialVolume (m3)
Cement1/10 x 26 m3
Sand3/10 x 26 m3
Aggregate6/10 x 26 m3

To calculate the volumes of the individual materials, you would divide the total volume of concrete required by the sum of the ratios of the materials in the mix. In this case, the sum of the ratios is 1 + 3 + 6 = 10.

Here is a table that shows the calculations for estimating the amounts of cement, sand, and aggregate needed to produce 26 cubic meters (m3) of 1:3:6 concrete:

MaterialVolume (m3)
Cement1/10 x 26 m3
Sand3/10 x 26 m3
Aggregate6/10 x 26 m3

To calculate the volumes of the individual materials, you would divide the total volume of concrete required by the sum of the ratios of the materials in the mix. In this case, the sum of the ratios is 1 + 3 + 6 = 10. Therefore, to calculate the volume of cement required, you would divide the total volume of concrete by 10 and then multiply the result by 1, which is the ratio of cement in the mix. To calculate the volume of sand required, you would divide the total volume of concrete by 10 and then multiply the result by 3, which is the ratio of sand in the mix. To calculate the volume of aggregate required, you would divide the total volume of concrete by 10 and then multiply the result by 6, which is the ratio of aggregate in the mix.

Here are the calculations for estimating the amounts of cement, sand, and aggregate needed to produce 26 m3 of 1:3:6 concrete:

Cement: 1/10 x 26 m3 = 2.6 m3

Sand: 3/10 x 26 m3 = 7.8 m3

Aggregate: 6/10 x 26 m3 = 15.6 m3

Cement: Therefore, to calculate the volume of cement required, you would divide the total volume of concrete by 10 and then multiply the result by 1, which is the ratio of cement in the mix.

Sand: To calculate the volume of sand required, you would divide the total volume of concrete by 10 and then multiply the result by 3, which is the ratio of sand in the mix.

Aggregate: To calculate the volume of aggregate required, you would divide the total volume of concrete by 10 and then multiply the result by 6, which is the ratio of aggregate in the mix.

Here are the calculations for estimating the amounts of cement, sand, and aggregate needed to produce 26 m3 of 1:3:6 concrete:

Cement: 1/10 x 26 m3 = 2.6 m3

Sand: 3/10 x 26 m3 = 7.8 m3

Aggregate: 6/10 x 26 m3 = 15.6 m3

ow to convert cement m3 to bags of cement?

To convert the volume of cement from cubic meters (m3) to the number of bags of cement, you will need to know the size of the bags of cement and the density of the cement.

The size of the bags of cement is usually expressed in terms of the mass of the cement contained in the bag, such as 50 kg or 40 lb. The density of cement can vary depending on the type of cement and the conditions under which it is stored, but a typical density for Portland cement is around 1440 kg/m3.

To convert the volume of cement from m3 to the number of bags, you can use the following formula:

Number of bags = (Volume of cement in m3) / (Volume of one bag of cement in m3)

To calculate the volume of one bag of cement in m3, you can use the following formula:

Volume of one bag of cement in m3 = (Mass of one bag of cement in kg) / (Density of cement in kg/m3)

For example, let’s say you need a volume of 5 m3 of cement and you are using 50 kg bags of cement with a density of 1440 kg/m3. To calculate the number of bags you need, you can use the following steps:

  1. Calculate the volume of one bag of cement in m3: (50 kg) / (1440 kg/m3) = 0.035 m3
  2. Calculate the number of bags you need: (5 m3) / (0.035 m3) = 142.86 bags

In this example, you would need approximately 143 bags of cement to produce a volume of 5 m3 of cement.

How to convert volume of sand aggregate into weight in kg?

To convert the volume of sand or aggregate from cubic meters (m3) to its weight in kilograms (kg), you will need to know the density of the sand or aggregate. The density of a material is a measure of its mass per unit volume. It is expressed in units of mass per volume, such as kg/m3 or lb/ft3.

To convert the volume of sand or aggregate from m3 to its weight in kilograms, you can use the following formula:

Weight (kg) = (Volume in m3) x (Density in kg/m3)

For example, let’s say you have a volume of 1 m3 of sand with a density of 1600 kg/m3. To calculate the weight of the sand in kilograms, you can use the following calculation:

Weight (kg) = (1 m3) x (1600 kg/m3) = 1600 kg

In this example, the weight of the sand would be 1600 kg.

To convert the volume of sand or aggregate from m3 to its weight in pounds (lb), you can use the following formula:

Weight (lb) = (Volume in m3) x (Density in lb/ft3) x (35.3147 ft3/m3)

For example, let’s say you have a volume of 0.5 m3 of aggregate with a density of 3200 lb/ft3. To calculate the weight of the aggregate in pounds, you can use the following calculation:

Weight (lb) = (0.5 m3) x (3200 lb/ft3) x (35.3147 ft3/m3) = 5630.94 lb

In this example, the weight of the aggregate would be approximately 5631 lb.

Keep in mind that these calculations are just estimates, and the actual weight of the sand or aggregate may vary depending on factors such as the type and quality of the material, the size and shape of the project, and the ambient conditions. It is always a good idea to allow for some margin of error when calculating the materials needed for a project.

Density of Material

Here is a table showing a range of densities for cement, sand, and aggregate in kilograms per cubic meter (kg/m3) and pounds per cubic foot (lb/ft3):

MaterialDensity (kg/m3)Density (lb/ft3)
Cement1000-1600145-230
Sand1500-1800100-115
Aggregate1600-2400110-150

Keep in mind that the densities of these materials can vary depending on the type and quality of the material, as well as the ambient conditions. These values are just a rough guide, and the actual densities of the materials you are using may be different. It is always a good idea to measure or determine the density of the materials you are using as accurately as possible to ensure that your calculations are accurate.

About author

Saad is a civil engineer by profession and love to explore innovative ideas relevant to construction, civil engineering, and home improvement. He loves writing about concrete, DIY guides, home improvement tips, technologies, and more.
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