Download Prestressed Concrete Design 2nd Edition by M.K.Hurst


Download Prestressed Concrete Design 2nd Edition by M.K.Hurst


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Prestressed concrete is the most recent of the major forms of construction to be introduced into structural engineering. Although several patents were taken out in the last century for various prestressing schemes, they were unsuccessful because low-strength steel was used, with the result that long-term effects of creep and shrinkage of the concrete reduced the prestress force  so much that any advantage was lost. It was only in the early part of the twentieth  century that the French engineer Eugène Freyssinet approached the problem in a systematic way and, using high-strength steel, first applied the technique  of prestressing concrete  successfully.  Since  then prestressed concrete has become a well-established method of construction, and the technology is available in most developed, and in many developing, countries. An account of some of the early developments in prestressed concrete is given in Walley (1984).

Download Prestressed Concrete Design 2nd Edition by M.K.Hurst

Title


Prestressed Concrete Design

Edition


 2nd Edition

Author


 M.K. Hurst

MSc, DIC, MICE, MIStruct.E

Publishers


E& FN Spon

Chapman & Hall

Table of Contents


Basic principles     1

      1.1 Introduction     1

      1.2 Methods of prestressing     6

      1.3 Structural behaviour     9

      1.4 Internal equilibrium     12

      1.5 Deflected tendons     16

      1.6 Integral behaviour     18

      1.7 Forces exerted by tendons     19

      1.8 Loss of prestress force     23

      1.9 Degrees of prestressing     24

      1.10 Safety     25

       Problems     25

2   Properties of materials     29

      2.1 Strength of concrete     29

      2.2 Modulus of elasticity of concrete     30

      2.3 Creep of concrete     32

      2.4 Shrinkage of concrete     32

      2.5 Lightweight concrete     34

      2.6 Steel for prestressing     34

      2.7 Relaxation of steel     36

      2.8 Stress-strain curves for steel     37

      2.9 Corrosion of steel     40

3   Limit state design     42

      3.1 Introduction     42

      3.2 Limit states     42

      3.3 Characteristic loads and strengths     44

     

Page viii

      3.4 Partial factors of safety     46

      3.5 Stress-strain curves     48

      3.6 Loading cases     49

      3.7 Allowable stresses     51

      3.8 Fire resistance     51

      3.9 Fatigue     53

      3.10 Durability     54

      3.11 Vibration     55

4   Loss of prestress force     57

      4.1 Introduction     57

      4.2 Elastic shortening     58

      4.3 Friction     61

      4.4 Anchorage draw-in     67

      4.5 Variation of initial prestress force along a member     67

      4.6 Long-term losses     70

      4.7 Total prestress losses     73

      4.8 Measurement of prestress force     73

      4.9 Initial overtensioning     76

       Problems     76

5   Analysis of sections     79

      5.1 Introduction     79

      5.2 Serviceability limit state     80

      5.3 Additional steel stress due to bending     83

      5.4 Post-cracking behaviour     84

      5.5 Ultimate load behaviour     86

      5.6 Variation of steel stress     90

      5.7 Design ultimate strength     91

      5.8 Simplified concrete stress block     94

      5.9 Design charts     94

      5.10 Untensioned reinforcement     96

      5.11 Cracked members     97

      5.12 Members with unbonded tendons     100

       Problems     103

6   Deflections     107

      6.1 Limits to deflection     107

      6.2 Short-term deflections of uncracked members     108

      6.3 Long-term deflections     112

      6.4 Deflections of cracked members     113

      6.5 Load balancing     117

      6.6 Load-deflection curves     118

       Problems     119

Page ix

7    Shear     120

      7.1 Introduction     120

      7.2 Design shear resistance     120

8    Prestressing systems and anchorages     126

      8.1 Pretensioning systems     126

      8.2 Post-tensioning systems     127

      8.3 Bursting forces in anchorage zones     133

      8.4 Transmission lengths in pretensioned members     138

9    Design of members     142

      9.1 Introduction     142

      9.2 Basic inequalities     142

      9.3 Design of prestress force     146

      9.4 Magnel diagram     149

      9.5 Cable zone     151

      9.6 Minimum prestress force     154

      9.7 Ultimate strength design     156

      9.8 Cracked members     157

      9.9 Choice of section     161

      9.10 Flow charts for design     162

      9.11 Detailing     163

       Problems     166

10    Composite construction     170

      10.1 Introduction     170

      10.2 Serviceability limit state     170

      10.3 Ultimate strength     174

      10.4 Horizontal shear     176

      10.5 Vertical shear     179

      10.6 Deflections     180

      10.7 Differential movements     182

      10.8 Propping and continuity     186

      10.9 Design of composite members     188

       Problems     189

11    Indeterminate structures     191

      11.1 Introduction     191

      11.2 Secondary moments     191

      11.3 Linear transformation and concordancy     200

      11.4 Ultimate load behaviour     204

       Problems     208

     

Page x

12   Prestressed flat slabs     211

      12.1 Introduction     211

      12.2 Two-way load balancing     211

      12.3 Equivalent-frame analysis     214

      12.4 Design and detailing     217

      12.5 Ultimate strength     225

      12.6 Shear resistance     227

13   Design examples     234

      13.1 Introduction     234

       Example 13.1     235

       Example 13.2     243

    Solutions to problems     252

    Bibliography     254

    Index     256

Overview of the Book


An overall view of the behaviour of prestressed concrete structures is given in  Chapter 1.  Chapter 2 deals with material properties, while limit state design is  outlined in  Chapter 3. The detailed considerations  in the analysis and design of  statically determinate prestressed concrete structures are dealt with in Chapters 4–10.  Chapter 11 gives an introduction to statically  indeterminate prestressed concrete  structures and  Chapter 12 outlines the design principles for the most important application of such structures in buildings, namely flat slabs, based on the provisions  of TR43. Finally, Chapter 13 contains the computer spreadsheets noted above.   Problems are given at the ends of many of the chapters for further exercise. For  rapid solution, some of these require the  use of simple structural analysis or spreadsheet computer programs, which are widely available.

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